When parents come to stay

An itinerary for when Parents/grandparents come to visit.

Usually when people have their parents over to visit it is for a longer period of time – so there’s no need for a set one or two-week itinerary. Instead I’ve listed the places I’ve tried and tested with my parents and other guests we’ve had that I think all ages would enjoy.

There’s a few things to bear in mind if you’re planning days out with older guests:
  • The heat can be really hard work so take things slow, make sure they carry water bottles, wear a hat and you stop for plenty of comfort breaks. Bear this in mind when deciding where to go; there’s always a toilet in a shopping centre, MRT station and at attractions and usually a cafe and food centre too.
  • If walking is difficult make the most of any free shuttle buses, trams and mobility scooters that places like Gardens By The Bay offer.
  • I hired an electric scooter for my dad as he cannot walk very far due to “dodgy knees”. I got it from Delcon who were extremely helpful. You could also hire a wheelchair if you are confident someone is able to do the pushing. Remember, Singapore’s pavements are not always the best place for those less able though so take this into consideration too.
  • Don’t assume older guests are not interested in the more adventurous days out. My mum loved Universal Studios and was on and off the rides as much as the rest of us. Dad couldn’t go on much but still enjoyed pottering around after us.
  • Taking the kids with you is great, but some of the days out may not work. For example, not many children would enjoy the orchid garden at Botanics, but most older adults would. Let them have some space away from the kids if necessary.
View from smoke & mirrors bar, singapore

Our more mature friends have enjoyed the night life too!

ogre universal

Universal Studios is for the young, and young at heart.

Jurong Bird Park

A fascinating place with more birds than you can ever imagine. We had lunch with the parrots as my sister had bought it as a birthday pressie for my dad  –  and it was great fun. There’s a splash park there too so great if you get too hot. A lovely wander round can take all day with shows and feedings to take in and there are plenty of benches and cool spots to rest in when you need to. All info on their website

Gardens by The Bay

You could visit the gardens over two days as they are huge and there’s a fair bit of walking involved. If your guests are at all interested in flowers you should definitely take them to the flower dome. There’s often special themed exhibitions on like Chinese New Year, Christmas, Tulips and so on, and these are always stunning to see. There’s a nice little cafe inside to grab a cuppa when you need to. The Cloud Dome is also really interesting but do take jumpers as it’s freezing in there.

flowers in dome

The flower Dome is spectacular.

If they’ve got a head for heights take them to Supertree Grove and the OCBC Skyway. Lovely views of the gardens from up there.

If you have done it over two days  leave later one day and have an early dinner at Sate By The Bay before watching the Singing Trees do their thing. Everyone loves this part of the holiday and it’s not to be missed.

Botanic Gardens

Probably the place most parents seem to know about are the Botanic Gardens as they are world famous.  Take a picnic or plan to have lunch at one of the many cafes. Take your time and again make sure you’ve got plenty of water with you. There are toilets inside the gardens and places to refill your water bottles. Things to look out for are include Symphony Lake, Ginger garden and Orchid Garden. However, some of the Orchid Garden is closed due to enhancement work. If you are visiting with kids don’t miss the Jacob Ballas Children’s Garden.

Raffles

Take your parents for look around Raffles if it’s open. Don’t just head for a drink though as you can wander around the courtyard and grounds and visit the gift shop which has some lovely gifts to take home. It is essential to stop at the Long Bar for a Singapore Sling thought and take in the old colonial atmosphere of the place. However, please note the hotel is undergoing extensive renovation work at the moment (October 2017) so do check before you go. The Bar and Billiard Room is still open serving the famous Singapore Sling.

 

Afternoon Tea

fullerton high tea

Afternoon tea at The Clifford Pier is well worth it.

Book them in to one of the many afternoon or high tea’s that most of the hotels offer. I took my parents to the one at the Fullerton Bay at Clifford Pier and it really is a spectacular venue. This is not a traditional afternoon tea though so bear in mind that you won’t  get finger sandwiches and traditional scones. However, it is delicious. The Shangri La on Orange Grove Road does a great high tea in the Rose Verandah and there are plenty of other places to try too. In fact, if you get bored of it, ask me and I’ll take them – I love an afternoon tea!

Bumboat along the river

This is a great way to while away the morning or afternoon and you can choose where to get off. I’d suggest getting on at Clarke Quay and then make your first stop at Clifford Pier to see the original Merlion at Merlion park. Plenty of photo opportunities here. Then walk down to the Fullerton Bay Hotel and go in to reception. Not only will this give them a respite from the heat it offers a spot for a loo break! They can also take in the stunning hotel lobby.

Once you’ve taken in the sights around there, jump back on a boat and see the rest of the river. Just make sure you buy a ticket that allows you to hop on and off.

Museums

Any of the museums are well worth a visit. I particularly like the Peranakan Museum as it’s not too big and has a lot of fascinating information about Singapore’s heritage. Changi War Museum is also popular and also well worth a visit. Then of course there’s the National Museum, Asian Civilisations Museum, Malay Heritage Centre and so on.

Smaller, but worth checking out especially if you have kids to entertain too is the Mint Toy Museum; a small museum which is packed to rafters with toys and memorabilia from all the century’s. Everyone can find their favourite childhood heros from Noddy to the Avengers. It’s good fun for an hour or so and is right by Raffles so you could do both in the same day. If you do visit Mint, be sure to go right to the bar at the top – which may or may not be open – as it has some lovely views and some old school tin signs that will have you reminiscing.

peranakan museum

The Peranakan Museum is a glimpse back to how Singapore began

Bollywood Veggies

I had a great day out here with my parents and the kids. Set way out (north) west in Kranji, Bollywood Veggies is a fantastic spot that many people don’t know about. Essentially a farm and a bistro/cafe, this is a unique day out that you will all find interesting. The self-named ‘Warriors’ who own and run it have a great sense of humour and this is apparent throughout the farm – quirky signs telling you to help with the leaf clearance in return for a drink in the cafe and warnings about torture trees all make for a different kind of day out. Lunch at the bistro is amazing, and although you may need to encourage a little adventurous tasting as it’s local food, you will not be disappointed. Try one of the platters – they are delicious!

Kranji War Memorial

The graves at Kranji War Memorial

Kranji War Memorial

You can stop here on the way to or from Bollywood Veggies. A tribute to all the fallen from the UK, Australia, Canada, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, India, Malaya and the Netherlands who died defending Singapore and Malaya against invading Japanese forces during World War 11. The memorial consists of war graves, the Memorial Walls, the State Cemetery and the Military Graves.

East Coast Park

Great for a relaxing stroll when you want an easy day. Wide open paths and cycle paths mean everyone can choose their way to travel. You can hire bikes here too. Pack a picnic, lots of water and have an easy stroll.

scooter and scooter

All types of transport welcomed at East Coast Park.

The Merlion on Sentosa

Situated in Sentosa, take them for a lovely stroll along the Merlion walk and then  in to the Merlion itself to hear about the myth, make a wish and ring the bell. You can use the lift to get to the mouth of the lion for a great shot over Singapore. Those more able can go right to the top of the head although there are still a few steps to climb. But there are benches for those that can’t manage them so you can go up whilst they wait in the cool.

Little India

A wander around Little India is often something older guests enjoy. If you can get a guide like those run by Road to India even better, as Poojah, the well-informed guide will explain the etiquette of the temples and some of the meaning behind what you are seeing. Stop for lunch at the hawker or one of the many restaurants if you want to try some of the best Indian food in Singapore. Wander around the markets and marvel at the dresses and saris on display. You might even want to try some on.

If, like most mums, your mum loves a bargain take her to Mustafa’s. Many claim you can buy ANYTHING you want there. From toys to suits, flour to fresh fish, they will be amazed. It’s huge though so don’t get lost! 

Singapore Zoo

This day out will involve a LOT of walking so I would only suggest this if you hire a wheelchair or scooter for less able guests. Check the website for more info as the zoo does have some to rent. It’s a great day out though and you can take it as slowly as need be. Lots of benches, shaded areas and cafes to stop when necessary as well as a tram that can take you around too. Watching the many animal shows and feedings also offers a sit down when needed.

orangutan at Singapore Zoo

Monkey around at Singapore Zoo.

Theatre in Singapore

A night at the theatre or a live performance is always a safe bet as far as I’m concerned. More often than not you’ll find something of interest on here – whether it’s a free music concert at the esplanade or a west end musical on tour at MBS. Have a look online for what’s around. These websites are helpful. http://www.baseentertainmentasia.com/ https://www.esplanade.com/ http://www.srt.com.sg/ http://pangdemonium.com/

McRitchie Reservoir

If your parents/guests are good walkers they’ll love a wander around McRitchie. For the more fit and adventurous there’s the treetop walk. Not something I’d suggest unless very good walkers though! But a stroll around the reservoir is pretty easy-going and you’ll still get to see the resident monkeys if you’re lucky. Whatever you do thought, DON’T feed them or offer them anything. They can be quite cheeky and have been known to swipe bags from tables!

Marina Bay Sands

If everyone is really tired of the heat then head to one of the shopping centres. They are all air-conditioned and if you choose MBS, you’ll find a few added attractions as well. Think Venetian style canal and traditional Sampan rides. If you time it well you’ll see the Rain Oculus too – this is a large whirlpool that forms inside a 70-foot diameter acrylic bowl and falls two stories to a pool below. The artwork, a collaboration with architect Moshe Safdie, functions as both a skylight and a rain collector. The rain water is recycled back to the whirlpool and also fills the canal that runs through the atrium.

canal at mbs

Take a stroll along the river inside the shopping centre!

Stop for lunch somewhere – you could go something more local like the every popular Din Tai Fung or go elegant at TWG. There’s also every kind of option from Gordon Ramsey to Wolfgang Puck as well as a food hall. For more information on where to eat look at the MBS website.

And remember…

These are just some suggestions. Don’t forget if your parents are visiting all they really want to do is see you and your family. If you have to work or have other commitments, leave them with instructions on how to get a cab, who to contact if there’s a problem and some ideas of things to do during the day. If you are a member of a club get them a temporary pass (most offer them for family visitors) and they can go there as often as they like. Also don’t forget to explain how to use the air con, open the door/gate and get out of the condo if you’re in one. It might be obvious to you, but to guests it’s all new.

Invite some of your Singapore friends over to meet your family. Have a barbecue or a casual dinner. Your parents will really appreciate seeing who you spend your time with and it will make things easier when talking on the phone next. It may also help to reassure them that you are doing okay here and that you have a nice life here.

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The perfect getaway?

Idyllic beach anyone?

Idyllic paradise beach anyone?

When I was looking to take my little sis somewhere special for her (ahem, sorry about this sis) 40th birthday while she was here visiting with her family I ran through all the usual ideas. Swanky restaurants, weekends on Bintan, spas breaks, staycay at MBS and so on. But, being the selfish person I am, I figured why not make it something I’d enjoy too – in fact something both of our families would enjoy. I’d heard about this special island just off Malaysia and started doing some digging. A couple of days later and we were booked. I didn’t tell sis, or her family. It was all going to be a big surprise. And what a surprise it was for us all.

Fun on the boat over

Fun on the boat over

Batu Batu is a private resort set on the previously uninhabited island of Pulau Tengah – meaning middle island – just 16km off the coast of Malaysia. A quick drive through the Johor border and over to Mersing and then it’s a quick 20 minute boat trip on the resorts own speedboat. Simples!

The resort is a relatively new venture having opened its jetty just four years ago in 2012. Built with sustainability in mind all of the buildings on the resort were constructed by local carpenters using traditional techniques and a huge emphasis is placed on preservation of not only the island, but its wildlife, flora and fauna.

Check in, check out
As you spot Batu Batu in the distance, honestly there is something that happens to you. A sigh escapes your body that is barely discernible. As the boat glides in to the jetty and you climb the rustic wooden steps a lightness seems to take over. The expanse of sea and sand is breathtaking and if traveling with children, hold on to them tightly, as you may find they can’t resisit the urge to throw themselves off the jetty right there in to the ridiculously clear waters is almost overwhelming. There’s plenty of time for that later on.
We were met by a friendly young man called Nicholas (we were all – grown men included already falling for his french accent, laid back swagger and stories of sharks in the water) who led us along the jetty towards ‘reception.’ As we passed wooden Kampung style villas nestled amongst the rocks and spied steps that led down to white, sandy beaches – the island has eight such beaches for you explore –  it was clear this wasn’t your typical resort at all.

Even the loos had a picture perfect view

We were shown to the restaurant area – having passed the office, reception and shop without actually realising it – and encouraged to relax on huge wooden chairs, given refreshing drinks and handed cold flannels to cool us down. As we took in our surroundings the smiles on everyone’s faces grew, the knots in our shoulders loosened and the shoes on our feet were kicked off.

 

Eating at Batu Batu
A spacious open sided pavillion with views across the sea whichever way you turn, the restaurant and bar area is not a bad place to sit and while away some time. As we had arrived on the early boat we knew our room wouldn’t be ready and took the offer of lunch while it was prepared.

At Batu Batu all meals are included in the ‘board basis’ which you pay for when booking. This includes a buffet breakfast, two course lunch (main and dessert) and three course dinner (starter, main and dessert). The menu changes daily and whilst we were there there was a choice of 4 or 5 dishes each day ranging from fresh local seafood to traditional Malaysian dishes. Children are well catered for with their own menu, or they can opt to have a smaller version of the grown ups food if they like. Our young people were mixed in their tastes and the staff were always happy to accommodate (“fries with that, of course,” “less spciy randang, no problem”)

The adults were more than happy with the food too with portion sizes keeping us full between meals. If we did get a little peckish though there was always fruit and home made cake available.

Villa amore
Even though there are just 22 villas on the whole resort – I swear I spotted no more than half a dozen, which is testament to the design and layout of Batu Batu. With a choice of beach, ocean, poolside or jungle villas it’s best to choose dependent on your needs and preferences. We opted for beach villas which, as promised, were sat directly on the island’s ‘Sunrise beach’ and are ideal if you have a few beachcombers in your group.

The jungle villas are set back from the coast and offer a bit more privacy being nestled in the jungle. But to get to them there are a good few steps to climb; not good for those who are not as agile on their feet. The ocean villas offered stunning views out across the sea and are set in to the rocks. Again a few steps to climb –  though not as many. The two poolside villas are better suited to larger families as they have two bedrooms (all the others are one bedroom with or without children’s annexe) and are directly behind the resorts only pool.

Our villa on the beach

Our villa was simple and yet stunning. With a huge four poster bed taking centre stage offering views out to the beach and ocean. A separate and equally massive bathroom led off the main room and held double sinks, wardrobes, a dressing area, shower and toilet. A large bathtub sat regally in front of the almost floor length windows inviting you to take a soak and watch the sun go down. Interestingly, the windows – that can make you feel slightly, shall we say, exposed at a time you may prefer some privacy – are cleverly designed so that they offer a feeling of being outside without those on the outside seeing in. We know, we tested it out.

To the other side of the main room was a small, but perfectly formed ‘annex’ – a room with just bunk beds in to accommodate children. We found it comfortably accommodated our 10 year old and surprisingly our 17 year old. Our 15 year old opted for the daybed in the main room. This layout worked fine for us for the few days we were there. Anyway, who wants to stay in the room when you’ve got the beach on your doorstep?

All of the rooms had everything you’d need for a comfortable stay including wi-fi (though this was hit and miss; something I liked as it meant phones were switched off), dvd player, iPod speakers, tea and coffee making facilities, mini bar etc.  There were some simple but really helpful touches too like the plastic box in which to store your snacks away from any mini critters and gorgeous smelling, environmentally friendly toiletries.

Beachside bliss
A balcony complete with daybed led you out to the star of the show, the beach. Most of the time we were there it felt like our own private beach and many an hour was spent snoozing on the sunbeds listening to the sound of the sea or watching the kids look for shells. Every now and you may spot someone having a wander past but very rarely was our peace interrupted. Again this is testament to the way the resort has been designed.

Sigh!

Sigh!

The pool – an infinity pool – on the other hand was a slightly different story. This was where a lot of the kids hung out and despite our protestations we did spend some time there. As with any resort pool, children can be a bit noisy (not ours of course!) so if I were returning sans kids I’d definitely give the pool area a miss, which is pretty easy to do considering the choice of beaches to relax on. It wouldn’t be hard to find yourself a quiet spot away from noisy youngsters. But honestly, this was only occasionally, we had the pool to ourselves on occasion too.

Diving Divas

Listening carefully

The girls listening carefully

If sitting on a beach relaxing isn’t your thing one of the other attractions of Batu Batu is the fact that it is surrounded by stunning coral reefs and clear blue waters that beg you to dive in to explore. Last year saw the opening of the resorts dive centre – with all profits generated from it going straight back in to environmental projects on and around the island.

With various PADI programmes open to anyone over 8 years old (and who meet the medical requirements) this is not a bad place to start your diving hobby. As the two youngest members of our group discovered.

Still listening

Still listening

Two, patient, fun and confident instructors took the two girls off, kitted them out in full wetsuit and diving gear and before we knew it they were fully fledged Bubblemakers and could be spotted as little black dots heading down to the ocean floor.  Us mums were a little pale faced and needed a cocktail or two, but this was an experience that the kids were absolutely raving about afterwards (and ever since) and both were keen to go back for more. For those who didn’t dive there is the option of snorkeling and this kept many of our group occupied as they were gone for hours exploring around the islands reef. Even if you didn’t want to dive you could let off some steam by hiring out kayaks or trekking through the interior of the island. You really can be as active as you like.

Somewhere down there are our baby girls!

Somewhere down there are our brave baby girls!

Added extras

The resort also offers a spa where you can be pampered with massages, facials, pedicures and so on. We had to try it out – for research purposes obviously – and can verify it’s worth a visit or two. There’s also a kids club where the littlies can spend some time away from mum and dad. Ours didn’t use it as they were having too much fun on the beach and in the pool, but should think it’d come in handy for some.

Tremendous Turtles

IMG_3817For me – and in fact, the whole group – though, the true highlight of our time on Batu Batu came in the form of eggs and what came out of them. The ethos of the Lasalvy’s ever since they began building the resort was to ‘tread lightly’ so the turtles that come to nest on their island have been in the forefront of their mind from the beginning. Turtle Watch Camp on ‘Long Beach’ is a program they run to help protect, conserve and educate visitors about and is something they are rightly proud of. Before the camp was set up many of the eggs laid on this and the surrounding islands were subject to illegal poaching (the eggs are a delicacy in some parts of Asia)  and the Dugong and Green turtles had become endangered – the Hawksbill turtle critically so.

The turtle hatchery

The turtle hatchery

Now, through monitoring nests, a controlled hatchery and spreading the word to its visitors, the conservation team at Batu Batu are really making a difference. The turtles continue to nest and the Camp help keep their eggs safe until they hatch, then they gently help them on their way. If you are lucky – as we were – you’ll get to see the tiny baby turtles released; a truly magical experience. (see turtle camp blog post for more on this)

 

Sunsets and cocktails
As well as Turtle Watch Camp, Long Beach is home to the beach bar. Just as any good beach bar should it had a decent cocktail list and plenty of cold beers as well as juices and smoothies and was the perfect place to sit and watch the sun go down.

Don't miss cocktails on the beach.

Don’t miss cocktails on the beach.

It’s fair to say that once the sun goes down there isn’t that much going on at Batu Batu. The restaurant finishes serving around 9pm and most people have headed back to their villa by 10pm. So not the place to go if you like late nights.

Our time on Batu Batu can be summed up by something the usually stressed hubby said. “This is the first place I’ve been to and felt myself relax on the first day.” The fact he didn’t seem to mind too much that the wifi didn’t work too well was also a good indicator that we’d found somewhere worth visiting.

For more information visit the website at www.batubatu.com.my

Bye, bye beautiful Batu Batu

Bye, bye beautiful Batu Batu

 

 

Travelling with kids

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Have kids, will travel.

Most people agree that travelling with kids is hard.

Actually, most people except me.

I don’t find it hard travelling with kids per se. Yes, there are things you have to consider that you don’t when going it alone or with other grown ups. But, it always puzzles me when people use this as an excuse not to travel – especially abroad. Even when ours were young babies I never felt we shouldn’t get on that plane. In fact, I maintain that travelling with certain grown ups is WAY harder (ahem Mr 5gomad)!

Before you all start yelling at me, yes there’s a lot to think about. When you have toddlers, I agree, it is not the easiest thing to sit an airport for hours, confine them in a chair for even more hours and insist they keep the noise level to minimum. But honestly, it’s not unachievable. My motto is – what’s the worst that can happen? So they scream for 10 hours solid and you have a nervous breakdown. One cocktail around the pool and a few hours in a kids club later you’ll soon forget the toruture.

I remember a nanny friend of mine saying once that it’s not really much different to spending a day indoors in front of the TV on one of those ‘not in the mood’ days or when under the weather. Also, let’s face it, how many children would object to being given permission to spend hours watching cool films or playing games?

So, with that in mind here are my tips for travelling with children – young or old. Bear in mind, these are from personal experience, I haven’t googled this list and I’m sure there are plenty more practical ones like take loads of games, etc. But it’s not my style to copy and paste.

Before you go

Get them used to the idea of travelling. Show them where you’re going, let them get excited about what you are going to see, do and where you are staying. This is often overlooked as we forget that unless it’s Disney Land really, kids aren’t that interested in the sound of visiting Ang Kor Wat or relaxing in the Maldives. So show them stuff that you know they’ll be interested in – for my three it’s a decent looking pool and a nice hotel with maybe a local show thrown in and they’re sold.

As soon as their little legs can walk they can carry a bag. Even if all it holds is a comfy/baggy/soft toy type thing. Yes, you’ll curse the number of bags you have and you’ll curse me for suggesting this, but bear with me. When you’ve run out of room for the extras you’ve acquired along the way (mini knife and fork anyone?) and have a handy bag to put them in, you’ll be grateful. Also, when those little legs become the big strapping legs of a 18 year old you’ll be thankful for that extra bag carrier let me tell you.

Also, if it’s a special bag that always goes on holiday with you it’s a way of letting them know what’s coming up. Great if you have kids with special needs as it’s a way to help them feel more comfortable with the whole travelling issue.

Talking of special needs. If you have a child that has any kind of SN then don’t be backwards in coming forwards. Even with my Son who is now 15 I still board when the ‘those travelling with young children’ announcement is made (if I feel he has had enough). I don’t care if everyone tutts or sniffs around me. I explain our situation politely to the land crew and they are more often than not happy to accommodate.

Depending how far in advance you have booked the trip, if you can, avoid going to the cinema or watching newly released films in the run up to the holiday. That way you won’t get on the flight and hear cries of ‘Oh, I’ve seen that’. Having said that, what kid doesn’t like to watch the same film more than once?

Short haul flights

Load up the iPad with a couple of films, a couple of episodes of their favourite TV show and some games that they haven’t played before. Make it clear that the iPad cannot come out before the ‘magic light’ goes off overhead (the seatbelt sign) – maybe even say that the pilot him or herself has asked for this.

Take some snacks – this is a no brainer, but one I’ve often got caught out on as I’ve assume the children’s meal will be appealing enough. No! Nuts, bread rolls, easy to eat fruit (no peel to fiddle with), crackers and so on are all easy to carry, don’t need to be kept cool and travel ok. Obviously some countries restrict what you take in so watch out for that.

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This is what we hope for.

Don’t worry about everyone else around you. Oh yes, you will have seen the raised eyebrows and despairing looks of the guy behind/in front as you cajole little Johnny in to his seat whilst trying to strap tiny Johnny to your lap. So what? He should just think himself lucky he hasn’t got to do anything but listen to them – and maybe put up with some thrown food or a kick in the back every now and then. Don’t assume that your fellow passengers are berating you for having the audacity to bring children on a flight. Most of the time you’ll see sympathetic nods, grateful sighs and knowing smiles. Also, don’t assume it’s the people not travelling with kids who are the worst. I was once on a flight when another mum turned round and told me to tell my son to be quiet – she was travelling with her older daughter. I was shocked, how dare she break the code of motherhood? I asked him to be quiet whilst passing him a tambourine. That’s Karma that is.

Take along an extra pillow/soft toy/head prop if you can. The more comfortable you can make yourself and the kids, the better. You could also get one of those foot pillows if you can find one, I’ve never used them but they look pretty cool.

Make deals before you leave (if able to understand this). If they want to watch 5 films, they have to have a nap in between each one.You might get lucky and one of those naps will turn in to a longer sleep. If not, let them watch another film and they can make up for it whilst you’re sitting round the pool tomorrow. If they want to play some game for an hour, they have to sit still whilst you eat your (awful but always seem to eat it anyway) meal. Whatever works for you. Find your currency with them and barter!

Long haul

All of the above and then some! 

Face the fact that they will moan a bit. Or even a lot. Once you get your head around this it really is a matter of getting on with it. I moan on a plane, my husband moans on a plane. Why shouldn’t the kids? Just keep distracting them with another film, game, promise of ice cream when you get there. Honestly, lower your expectations 50% and you’ll be good to go.

Let them wander up and down at some point if they want to. Try to avoid the time when most people are sleeping, but don’t feel you have to pin them down the whole time. Unless, of course, you’ve got one of those children who charge up and down like a train – then strap them in and don’t let them move! (I’m kidding) Take them to the area near the emergency exits (resist all urges to open the door, no matter how bad it’s been up until then! Think of the cocktails woman, stop!) There you can let them see out the window without clambering over anyone. Maybe play eye spy? If you happen to be over an ocean it’ll be short game.

Wear comfy clothes. I know this sounds obvious but really, wear something you can lay in, be laid on in, that isn’t tight or irritating in any way. Something that when you have to stretch to the overhead locker for the millionth time you’re not self conscious of showing a part of you not normally on view.

Carry headache tablets. Just do.

If your child suffers from that hideous ear issue when flying there are a few ways to help this – all have varying results depending on the child. The usual sucking on a bottle (mine ALWAYS seemed to finish the whole thing just before we actually got up), sucking sweets, chewing on a teether. But I’ve also heard wearing ear plugs helps too. Google it – there’ll be other ideas out there. Try them and see what works for your child.

If you have a pukey child carry wipes and forage for all the sick bags you can before you take off. In my recent experience the cabin crew take a bit longer nowadays to come to the aid of a travel sick child and also cannot touch you or them. So they will throw lots of paper at you and then rather handily ask you to fill out a form in between catching puke. So just be prepared. Oh, and secret tip, the blanket they give you catches A LOT of sick if necessary!

One final piece of advice – start early. If you are a couple who like to travel why not travel with your kids? We started fairly easily with short haul flights to France from the UK and before we knew it we were heading to Oz with two young boys. Maybe it wasn’t a stroll in the park but whatever the flight was like I can’t remember so it couldn’t have been too bad. What I do remember – as do the boys – is seeing an amazing country and having a fantastic holiday though.

In my humble opinion, travel is the best gift we can give our children in terms of experiences. Without getting on with it, here’s just some of the things we would have missed…

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Scuba diving with your cousin.

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Searching for India Jones.

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Idyllic deserted beach anyone?

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Absolutely worth the flight.

 

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Hammocks and lazy days.

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Stunning sunflower fields of France.

Money aside, why wouldn’t you want your kids to see and experience all of this?

Do you have any tips for parents? Please share them in comments below. If you’ve got a funny story about travelling with kids, even better!